August 20, 2017

Wellness



Wellness Policy  

Purpose

The intent of this Policy is to ensure compliance with requirements of the federal Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004.[1]  In accord with those requirements, this Policy has been developed in consultation with parents, students, representatives of the school food
services authority, school administrators and the public.

Policy Statement

It is the policy of the Hartford School District to establish goals for nutrition education, physical activity and other school based activities that are designed to promote student wellness.  With the
objective of promoting student health and reducing childhood obesity, the district will also establish nutrition guidelines for all foods available at school during the school day.

I.    Goals for Nutrition Education.[2]

A.  The school district shall provide nutrition education programs as required by state law and regulations of the State Board of Education.  In particular, the district shall provide a nutrition component in its Comprehensive Health Education program and shall develop curricular programs intended to accomplish applicable goals enumerated in the Vermont Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities.[3]

B.  Nutrition education programs shall be conducted by appropriately licensed staff members.

C.  To the extent practicable, nutrition education shall be integrated into core curricula in areas, such as science and family and consumer science courses.

II.   Goals for Physical Activity[4]

A.  The district shall provide physical education classes for all students as required by Vermont School Quality Standards.

B.  The district shall provide other physical activity opportunities for students through recess periods in appropriate grades and, as appropriate, before or after school activities such as interscholastic athletics and physical activity clubs or intramural sports.

III. Goals for Other School Based Activities[5]

A.  The district shall ensure that guidelines for reimbursable school meals are not less restrictive than regulations and guidance issued by the Secretary of Agriculture pursuant to sections (a) and (b) of section 10 of the Child Nutrition Act and section 9(f)(1) and 17a of the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act as those regulations and guidance apply to schools.[6]

B.  The district shall provide adequate space for eating and serving school meals.

C.  The district shall provide a clean and safe meal environment for students.

D.  The district shall establish meal periods that provide adequate time to eat and are scheduled at appropriate hours.

E.  Food shall not be used in district schools as a reward or punishment.

F.  The district shall provide training opportunities as appropriate for food service and other staff members in areas of nutrition and wellness.


IV. Nutrition Guidelines[7]

A.  No foods of minimal nutritional value, as listed in 7 CFR 210, Appendix B and 7 CFR 220, Appendix B shall be sold in food service areas during breakfast and lunch periods.[8]

B.  The sale of foods during meal periods in food service areas shall be allowed only if all income from the sale, including the sale of approved foods or drinks from vending machines, accrues to the benefit of the school, the school food service program, or the student organizations sponsoring the sale.[9]

C.  To the extent practicable, the district shall ensure that foods offered at school other than through the National School Lunch or School Breakfast programs, including foods sold through vending machines, shall comply with the A la Carte and Vending Guidelines established by the Vermont Departments of Health and Education.

V.  Policy Implementation[10]

A.  The superintendent or his or her designee shall monitor district programs and curriculum to ensure compliance with this policy and any administrative procedures established to carry out the requirements of this policy.

B.  The superintendent or his or her designee shall report at least annually to the board on the district’s compliance with law and policies related to student wellness.  The report shall include an assurance that district guidelines for reimbursable meals are not less restrictive than regulations and guidelines issued for schools in accordance with federal law.

Date Adopted: August 11, 2009
Dates Revised:
Legal Reference(s).
·        16 V.S.A. §§131 & 906(b)(3).
·        Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act, 42 U.S.C. 1751 et seq.
·        Child Nutrition Act of 1966, 42 U.S.C. 1771 et seq.
·        Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004, Section 204 of
Public Law 108-265.
·        Code of Federal Regulations, 7 CFR Part 210 and Part 220.


Wellness Policy Resources

General Resources
National School Boards Association.  www.nsba.org.

Action for Healthy Kids.  www.actionforhealthykids.org.

CDC School Health Index.  www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/

National Association of State Boards of Education.  www.nasbe.org.

Vermont Department of Education Nutrition Policy Guidelines.
http://www.state.vt.us/educ/new/pdfdoc/pgm_nutrition/nutrition_policy_guidelines_05.pdf


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Nutrition Education Section

USDA Team Nutrition.  www.fns.usda.gov/tn.  Includes sample policy language, examples of state and local school district policies for nutrition education, and resources and implementation tools.  Go to Local Wellness Policy; then go to Local Wellness Policy Requirements; then go to Nutrition Education.

Kansas State Department of Education.
www.kn-eat.org/SNP/SNPShell/snp_wellness_policy.htm.  Includes Kansas “Eat Smart
Nutrition Education Guidelines for grades pre-K through 12.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Physical Activity Section

National Association of State Boards of Education.
http://nasbe.org/HealthySchools/physical_activity.html.  Includes Fit, Healthy,
and Ready to Learn: A School Health Policy Guide.

The National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity, NANA.
www.schoolwellnesspolicies.org.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Other School-Based Activities Section

National School Boards Association.  www.nsba.org. Contains a searchable website
for wellness policies and other health related programs such as AIDS-HIV,
adolescent health and many other topics and links.

Center for Disease Control.  www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/index.htm.  Contains model
policies and links to state and local policies.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Nutrition Guidelines Section
.
USDA Team Nutrition.  www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Healthy/wellnesspolicy.html.  See also
The Menu Planner for Healthy School Meals at this site at
http://teamnutrition.usda.gov/Resources/menuplanner.html. It explains the
nutrition standards for school breakfasts and lunches, as well as processes for
planning meals to meet those standards.   

North Carolina.  www.eatsmartmovemorenc.com. Contains North Carolina’s
Recommended Standards for All Foods Available in School, a publication that
covers foods and beverages found in traditional cafeteria meals as well as a la
carte item, vending machine drinks and snacks, and foods and beverages served in
after school programs and at school functions.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Policy Implementation Section.

School Nutrition Association.
http://wellness.schoolnutrition.org/content/home.aspx.  Includes various samples
of monitoring and policy review procedures.

Action for Healthy Kids.
www.actionforhealthykids.org/docs/specialreports/report_small.pdf. See Criteria
for Evaluating School-Based Approaches to Increasing Good Nutrition and Physical
Activity.



Wellness Policy Resources

General Resources
National School Boards Association.  www.nsba.org.

Action for Healthy Kids.  www.actionforhealthykids.org.

CDC School Health Index.  www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/

National Association of State Boards of Education.  www.nasbe.org.

Vermont Department of Education Nutrition Policy Guidelines.
http://www.state.vt.us/educ/new/pdfdoc/pgm_nutrition/nutrition_policy_guidelines_05.pdf


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Nutrition Education Section

USDA Team Nutrition.  www.fns.usda.gov/tn.  Includes ample policy language,
examples of state and local school district policies for nutrition education,
and resources and implementation tools.  Go to Local Wellness Policy; then go to
Local Wellness Policy Requirements; then go to Nutrition Education.

Kansas State Department of Education.
www.kn-eat.org/SNP/SNPShell/snp_wellness_policy.htm.  Includes Kansas “Eat Smart
Nutrition Education Guidelines for grades pre-K through 12.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Physical Activity Section

National Association of State Boards of Education.
http://nasbe.org/HealthySchools/physical_activity.html.  Includes Fit, Healthy,
and Ready to Learn: A School Health Policy Guide.

The National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity, NANA.
www.schoolwellnesspolicies.org.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Other School-Based Activities Section

National School Boards Association.  www.nsba.org. Contains a searchable website
for wellness policies and other health related programs such as AIDS-HIV,
adolescent health and many other topics and links.

Center for Disease Control.  www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/index.htm.  Contains model
policies and links to state and local policies.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Nutrition Guidelines Section
.
USDA Team Nutrition.  www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Healthy/wellnesspolicy.html.  See also
The Menu Planner for Healthy School Meals at this site at
http://teamnutrition.usda.gov/Resources/menuplanner.html. It explains the
nutrition standards for school breakfasts and lunches, as well as processes for
planning meals to meet those standards.  

North Carolina.  www.eatsmartmovemorenc.com. Contains North Carolina’s
Recommended Standards for All Foods Available in School, a publication that
covers foods and beverages found in traditional cafeteria meals as well as a la
carte item, vending machine drinks and snacks, and foods and beverages served in
after school programs and at school functions.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Policy Implementation Section.

School Nutrition Association.
http://wellness.schoolnutrition.org/content/home.aspx.  Includes various samples
of monitoring and policy review procedures.

Action for Healthy Kids.
www.actionforhealthykids.org/docs/specialreports/report_small.pdf. See Criteria
for Evaluating School-Based Approaches to Increasing Good Nutrition and Physical
Activity.





          




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[1] Section 204 of Public Law 108-265.  June 30, 2004.
[2] These goals are intended to be illustrative. Local policy makers should
consider the addition of locally established goals. For examples of goals used
elsewhere, consult the resources listed in the material accompanying this model
policy.
[3] 16 V.S.A. §§131 & 906.
[4] These goals are intended to be illustrative. Local policy makers should
consider the addition of locally established goals.  For examples of goals used
elsewhere, consult the resources listed in the material accompanying this model
policy.
[5] These goals are illustrative.  Local policy makers should consider the
addition of locally established goals.  For examples of goals used elsewhere,
consult the resources listed in the material accompanying this policy.
[6] This provision is required of schools participating in National School Lunch
and Breakfast programs.
[7] The federal law requires that local wellness policies include “nutrition
guidelines selected by the local educational agency for all foods available on
each school campus…during the school day with the objectives of promoting
student health and reducing childhood obesity.”  Include locally established
guidelines as appropriate.
[8] Required of schools participating in National School Lunch and Breakfast
programs.
[9] Required by cited federal regulations.
[10] The Child Nutrition and WIFC Reauthorization Act requires the establishment
of “a plan for measuring implementation of the local wellness policy, including
the designation of 1 person within the local education agency or at each school,
as appropriate, charged with operational responsibility for ensuring that the
school meets the local wellness policy.”  For examples of implementation plans,
consult the references cited in the materials accompanying this model policy.